1805 Info3f for John Crompton
Thomas' Houndales and Westfield farms - 1910 Valuation Survey

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The Houndales farms - an overview

Aerial view of Houndales Farms 2010 - 63kB jpg
Above: An aerial view of Houndales Farms 2010
1911 OS map of Houndales farms - 56kB jpg
Above: 1911 OS map of Houndales farms
1805info3f, sheet 2

The Valuation Survey 1910-15

Note: Over time there are various spellings of the farm's name: Howedale on the OS 1911 series and Houndale on the 2010 OS Landranger series. For the sake of continuity the spelling Houndales will be used as it appears in Thomas' original letter and at the present farm gate.

'The Valuation Survey 1910-15 was made for tax administration following the 1910 budget. They show the use and value of lands and buildings in Edwardian England and Wales. ... [It was] aimed to ensuring that private landowners should pay part of the increase in land values that was attributable not to their own labour and efforts for improvements but to expenditure by the State - for example the provision of improved roads, drainage and other public services. ... The 1910 Act provided for the levying of a number of duties on land, the principal one being called increment value duty. This was levied at the rate of 20% on any increase in the site value of land between the time of its initial valuation as at 30 April 1909 and the occasion of its sale or other transfer.' ... Many land owners won legal challenges to the Act until it 'was repealed by the Finance Act 1920. The valuation survey had cost two million pounds, not a fraction of which was recovered.' Source: Beech and Mitchell, 'Maps for Family and Local History', The National Archives, Kew, 2004, page 36.

Site Valuations appear to be calculated by multiplying a sum of money, at 1910 prices by a period of 25 years ie the actual rent and the tithe.

An overview of Thomas' farms

In his letter of 1944 Thomas gives a chronology of his properties.

After giving up Well Close at Lowthorpe in 1893, Thomas farmed Great and Little Houndales, which he owned, a combined size of 370 acres (150 hectares). In 1897 Little Houndales house was pulled down and rebuilt. There is no mention of this in the Valuation Survey expenses.

In 1902 he took the tenancy of his cousins farm at Westfield. With the Houndales he now farmed 573 acres (217 hectares). Thomas left the more valuable Great Houndales in 1903 but then rented the 11 acres (4.5 hectares) East Field land. This amounted to 352 acres (142 hectares).

There is the added complication of a property in West Gate. The 1911 census shows Thomas living in Driffield Road. However, the Valuation Survey lists T Crompton as owning a 10 acre (4 hectare) property in West Gate.

Little Houndales

Situated on the eastern edge of the 1910 Ordnance Survey 25 inches to the mile map Yorkshire ER CLX155, the farm buildings are clearly shown, together with the drive from Houndales Lane, now under the A614 Nafferton by-pass.

The broad red line marks the eastern boundary of the property. An equivalent map from the western edge was not available.

Right: Little Houndales farm buildings 1910

Map source: The National Archives (TNA) 1911 Valuation Survey map ER CLX155 Ref: IR/10/631
Little Houndales farm buildings Valuation Survey 1910 - 36kB jpg
1805info3f, sheet 3
This is the first of four pages from the valuation book for a survey taken after 06 April 1911. It  summarises the ownership and expenditures It is interesting to note:
  • Thomas is both the owner and the occupier on a yearly agreement from 6 April 1911.
  • The gross value of the property was at £3842, being £2850 for things growing on the land plus £800 for the structures shown on the map above and the £192 tithe.
  • An annual tithe of £7 13 shillings and 3 pence (£7.66) was still collected. The Valuation sum is equivalent to this tithe for 25 years.
  • The legacy of £120 for life could only have been paid to his nephew Charles reginald Crompton, who died of wounds 25 April 1918.

Right: Little Houndales 1910 Valuation Survey, page 1

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Source for all four pages: The National Archives (TNA) ref: IR 58/73922/119 Field Book for Harpham
Little Houndales 1910 Valuation Survey, page 1 - 56kB jpg
1805info3f, sheet 4
This is the second of four pages from the valuation book, which summarises the gross taxable value over a period of 25 years. It is interesting to note:
  • The gross value open market of the site, free of any encumbrances, was assessed at £3842.
  • The 109 acres were valued at £2850.
  • The buildings and structures, fruit trees and other things grown on the land were values at £650, but this was amended, without explanation, to £800.
  • To this was added the tithe of £192, calculated and rounded up for 25 years.
  • Repairs, perhaps for the year were £16 10 shillings and 9 pence (£16/10/9). Again this sum was deducted on a 25 year calculation.

Right: Little Houndales 1910 Valuation Survey, page 2

Click on the image to open an A4 size portrait image at 520kB on a new page. To print scale to 38%.

Source for all four pages: TNA ref: IR58/73922/119 Field Book for Harpham
Little Houndales 1910 Valuation Survey, page 2 - 50kB jpg
1805info3f, sheet 5
This is the third of four pages from the valuation book, which details the farm buildings, described as being in 'fairly good condition'. It is interesting to note:
  • Little Houndales was a four bedroomed brick and tile house, with the usual kitchen, scullery and dairy. However, there was a second, and probably, 'back' kitchen.
  • There was an ashpit toilet: ash from the fire was placed over the faeces to reduce odours, and then it was periodically dug out.
  • The farm buildings were primarily constructed of brick, with a wood and zinc 'Duke Barn and a covered enclosed fold yard for sheep or cattle.
  • There was stabling for six (working horses?), stabling for four and two loose boxes (for riding horses).
  • There was accommodation for cows and chickens.
  • The area of each field is listed, horizontally, against the Valuation Map numbers and totalled to 109.977 decimal acres, which the assessor has converted to 109 a[cres] 3 r[oods]
    36 p[erches]
  • Eleven fields listed: three are greater than 20 acres, four are around 10 acres, one is 6½ acres and three less than one acre.
  • There was a chalk quarry for farm track repairs.
Little Houndales 1910 Valuation Survey, page 3 - 92kB jpg
Note:
1 rood is a unit of area equal to ¼ acre (0.1012 hectares).
1 perch is a unit of area equal to one square rod or 5.5 square yards or 5.03m2.

Above right: Little Houndales 1910 Valuation Survey, page 3
Click on the image to open an A4 size portrait image at 520kB on a new page. To print scale to 38%.

Source for all four pages: TNA ref: IR58/73922/119 Field Book for Harpham
1805info3f, sheet 6
This is the fourth of four pages from the valuation book, which summarises the taxable value. It is interesting to note:
  • The Assessable Value was the same as the Full Site Value. There were no allowances deducted for the work and expenditure made by Thomas to improve his land.
  • The Full Site Value was the Gross Value less deductions for buildings.
  • The sporting rights were valued at £50 (shooting and hunting?).
Right: Little Houndales 1910 Valuation Survey, page 4

Click on the image to open an A4 size portrait image at 520kB on a new page. To print scale to 38%.

Source for all four pages: TNA ref: IR58/73922/119 Field Book for Harpham
Little Houndales 1910 Valuation Survey, page 4 - 85kB jpg
1805info3f, sheet 7
Nafferton Wold

This is the first of four pages from the valuation book for a survey taken after 06 April 1911. It summarises the ownership and expenditures It is interesting to note:

  • The map reference CLXI and the reference on page two places this land adjacent to Little Houndales. The Valuation Map for this property is not available.
  • Thomas was the freehold occupier of 20 acres of arable land, on a yearly tenancy agreement with six months notice at the end of the year.
  • The owner was Hepworth Frank Atkinson, Vicar of Lowthorpe with Ruston Parva.
  • The Vicar was responsible for the annual tithe of 11 shillings (55p), the Fee Farm Rent of 18 shillings and 8 pence (18/8 or 94p) and repairs.
  • The property had not been sold within the past 50 years.
  • There was supposed to be a right of way through the adjoining property.

Right: Nafferton Wold 1910 Valuation Survey, page 1

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Source for all four pages: The National Archives (TNA) ref: IR 58/73922/120 Field Book for Harpham
Nafferton Wolds Valuation Survey 1910, page 1 of 4 - 61kB jpg
1911 Census:      Sun/Mon 2nd April/3rd April 1911
Source:   TNA Ref:        RG14 PN 28855 
          Reg. Gen. Ref:  RG78 PN 1658 En.Dist: 5 Sched: 54
          RegDist: Driffield SubDist: Foston
Dwelling: Lowthorpe Vicarage              
Place:    Driffield, Yorkshire East Riding              
Rooms in dwelling, other than scullery, landing, lobby, closet, bathroom: 
Years married: 12         
Children:      Alive 1, dead none 

Name                     Rel  Mar Age  Occupation                   Status  Birthplace 
Hepworth Frank Atkinson  Head  M   49  Clergyman Established Church          At Sea Resident
                                                                             British subject by parentage
Anna Blanche Atkinson    Wife  M   53                                        Bucks, Little Marlow
Florence Amelia Prior    Serv  S   36  Cook Domestic                         Yorks, Beverley
Ethel Goodall            Serv  S   22  Housemaid Domestic                    Yorks, Hook
1805info3f, sheet 8
This is the second of four pages from the valuation book, which summarises the gross taxable value over a period of 25 years. It is interesting to note:
  • The land comprised of two little fields adjoining property 119, which was Little Houndales. The 20 acres 3 roods 16 perches comprised of two 10 acre fields, recorded as fields 176 and 177 on the Valuation Survey map west of ER CLX155 Ref: IR/10/631.
  • The market value of the property was assessed at £525.
  • To this was added £38 for the Tithe and Fee Farm making a Gross Value of £563 over 25 years.
  • There were no buildings or structures on the land. Other things grow on the land were assessed at £25.
  • Repairs, perhaps for the year were £2 10 shillings and 4 pence (£2.10.4 or £2.52). Again this sum was deducted on a 25 year calculation.
Page 3, not illustrated, details the two fields involved which are:
  • fields 176 and 177 on the Valuation Survey map, both 10 acre fields;
  • totalling 20 acres 3 roods 16 perches.
Right: Nafferton Wold 1910 Valuation Survey, page 2

Click on the image to open an A4 size portrait image at 433kB on a new page. To print scale to 38%.

Source for all four pages: TNA ref: IR58/73922/120 Field Book for Harpham
Nafferton Wolds Valuation Survey 1910, page 2 of 4 - 56kB jpg
1805info3f, sheet 9
This is the fourth of four pages from the valuation book, which summarises the taxable value. It is interesting to note:
  • The Assessable Value was £500. To this was added £25 for sporting rights.
  • The Full Site Value of £538 was the Gross Value of £563 less £25 deductions for 'other things grown on the land'
Right: Nafferton Wold 1910 Valuation Survey, page 4

Click on the image to open an A4 size portrait image at 467kB on a new page. To print scale to 38%.

Source for all four pages: TNA ref: IR58/73922/120 Field Book for Harpham
Nafferton Wolds Valuation Survey 1910, page 4 of 4 - 61kB jpg
1805info3f, sheet 10
Great Houndales

Great Houndales is included because this was the farm Thomas left, most probably on 5 April 1904, when this present tenancy started.

The valuation officer describes it as 'chiefly a tillage farm, with a small portion is grass and two small plantations.'

Right: The Valuation Survey map of Great Houndales farm buildings in and adjacent fields in 1910

Map source: TNA 1911 Valuation Survey map ER CLX155 Ref: IR/10/631
Great Houndales farm buildings Valuation Survey 1910 - 37kB jpg
Right: Great Houndales, Nafferton, with permission Nafferton Millennium Committee Houndales Farm - with permission Nafferton Millenium Committee - 12kB jpg
1805info3f, sheet 11
This is the first of four pages from the valuation book for a survey taken after 06 April 1911. It summarises the ownership and expenditures. It is interesting to note:
  • The farm is assessed at 261 acres 0 roods and 11 perches.
  • The freehold property was owned by Arthur john Wise of 9 The Crescent, Scarborough and rented, on an annual tenancy, for £330.
  • The gross value of the buildings were £307/15/0 (£307.75).
  • The pencil annotation reads: 'Sept 13.14 If this P.2 is not serves the area should be 26.3.27 as plantations are included in 608'.
  • Under the section on fixed charges, is recorded 'Part of interest £832:10:0 (£832.50) per annum paid by owner charged to the whole estate and apportioned at £57:9:0 (£57.45) per annum on their holding. Part of annuities £290:10:0 (£290.50) per annum charged on the whole estate and apportioned at £8:7:7 (£8.38) per annum on the holding.'
Right: Great Houndales 1910 Valuation Survey, page 1

Click on the image to open an A4 size portrait image at 558kB on a new page. To print scale to 38%.

Source for all four pages: TNA ref:
IR 58/73922/116 Field Book for Harpham
Great Houndales Valuation Survey 1910, page 1 of 4 - 63kB jpg
1805info3f, sheet 12
This is the second of four pages from the valuation book, which summarises the gross taxable value over a period of 25 years. It is interesting to note:
  • The gross value open market of the site, free of any encumbrances, was assessed at £7760, which is the rent of £330, plus £5 sporting value, minus the repairs of £25, multiplied by 25 years. This is twice the value of Little Houndales.
  • The 261 acres including roads, chalk pit, two small plantation and 28 acres
    0 roods and 12 perches of grass were valued at £6220, which is slightly more than double the Little Houndales value.
  • The buildings and structures, fruit trees and other things grown on the land were values at £1540, slightly less than double the Little Houndales value..
  • Repairs, perhaps for the year were £16 10 shillings and 9 pence (£943.63 in 2010 - which illustrates how unreliable these conversion are). Again this sum was deducted on a 25 year calculation.

Right: Great Houndales 1910 Valuation Survey, page 2

Click on the image to open an A4 size portrait image at 546kB on a new page. To print scale to 38%.

Source for all four pages: TNA ref:
IR 58/73922/116 Field Book for Harpham
Great Houndales Valuation Survey 1910, page 2 of 4 - 65kB jpg
1805info3f, sheet 13
This is the third of four pages from the valuation book, which details the farm buildings, described as being in 'fairly good condition'. It is interesting to note:
  • Houndales was a six bedroomed brick and tile house, part cement faced, with three reception rooms and the usual kitchen, scullery and cellar. The house was in good condition.
  • There was an brick and tile ashpit (qv) toilet and coal house.
  • Outside there was a lawn in front, a partially walled kitchen garden and small orchard.
  • The farm buildings were also brick and tile. Two granary lofts were over the stables. There was a cowhouse, barn, chaff house, turnip house, wagon shed.
  • There was stabling for twelve and four loose boxes (for riding horses).
  • The Valuation Officer reports that there was a good well and a complete water supply to the house and farm. Was this an improvement after the typhoid?
  • The area of each field is listed, horizontally, against the Valuation Map numbers and totalled to 261.220 decimal acres which the assessor has converted to 261 acres 0 roods and 11 perches.
  • Seventeen fields listed: the largest is 46 acres, three are greater than 20 acres, nine are greater than 10 acres, two are less than ten acres and two less than one acre.
  • There was a chalk quarry for farm track repairs.
Great Houndales Valuation Survey 1910, page 3 of 4 - 74kB jpg
Above right: Great Houndales 1910 Valuation Survey, page 3
Click on the image to open an A4 size portrait image at 520kB on a new page. To print scale to 38%.

Source for all four pages: TNA ref: IR58/73922/116 Field Book for Harpham
1805info3f, sheet 14
This is the fourth of four pages from the valuation book, which summarises the taxable value. It is interesting to note:
  • The Assessable Value was the same as the Full Site Value. There were no allowances deducted for the work and expenditure made by Thomas to improve his land.
  • The Full Site Value was the Gross Value less deductions for buildings.
  • The sporting rights were valued at £50 (shooting and hunting?).
Right: Great Houndales 1910 Valuation Survey, page 4

Click on the image to open an A4 size portrait image at 606kB on a new page. To print scale to 38%

Source for all four pages: TNA ref:
IR 58/73922/119 Field Book for Harpham
Great Houndales Valuation Survey 1910, page 4 of 4 - 68kB jpg
1805info3f, sheet 15
East Field

Thomas rented the land that was adjacent to Little Houndales. There is no Valuation Map for East Field.

This is the first of two pages from the valuation book for a survey taken after 06 April 1911. It is a summarises the ownership and expenditures. It is interesting to note:
  • The agricultural land of 11 acres 3 roods and 11 perches is split over the Ordnance Survey 1 to 25 miles sheets CLXI and CKXII.
  • It was rented from Thomas hopper Brynbedow of Porth, Glamorganshire on a yearly written agreement for £200 (£11,412) to include the adjoining farmhouse. Thomas was responsible for the properties internal repairs.
  • The gross value of the buildings was £15 and their rateable value was £13/10/0 (£13.50)
Right: East Field 1910 Valuation Survey, page 1

Click on the image to open an A4 size portrait image at 512kB on a new page. To print scale to 38%.

Source for both pages: TNA ref:
IR 58/73922/121 Field Book for Harpham

 
Eastfield 1910 Valuation Survey, page 1 - 55kB jpg
1805info3f, sheet 16
This is the second of two pages from the valuation book, which should summarise the gross taxable value over a period of 25 years. It is interesting to note:
  • There are no values on this page. This appears to have been included with the Heredis Great Driffield No 30.
  • The land is described as 'tillage land'.

Right: East Field 1910 Valuation Survey, page 2

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Source for both pages: TNA ref: IR58/73922/121 Field Book for Harpham


The remaining two pages contain no information.
Eastfield 1910 Valuation Survey, page 2 - 52kB jpg
1805info3f, sheet 17

Westfield

1911 OS maps showing Westfield - 84kB jpg
Above: 1911 OS maps showing Westfield Farm in relationship to Nafferton
Right: The 1911 Valuation Survey map of Westfield Farm buildings and adjacent fields

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Map source: 1910 Valuation Survey map ER CLX155 Ref: TNA IR/10/631
The 1911 Valuation Survey map of Westfield Farm - 38kB jpg
1805info3f, sheet 18
Right: Westfield, Nafferton, at the turn of the 21st century Westfield - home of Thomas Crompton - 50kB jpg
This is the first of four pages from the Westfield Farm  valuation book, which summarises the ownership and expenditures. It is interesting to note:
  • That Thomas leased the 233 acre and 1 rod (1 rod = 30¼ yards2 or 25m2) equivalent to 94.3 hectares Westfield Farm as a freeholder
  • The owners were Clara S Medforth and Mary E Wilson. These were the daughters of Ann elizabeth Crompton and William Wilson and the grand daughters of Thomas Crompton, born 1803 and Isabella Rowlin, who must have inherited the family land.
  • The were also the sisters of TC Wilson, who was Thomas' mentor and co-executor.
  • An annual rent of £300 (£17,118) was paid to the sisters.

Right: Westfield 1910 Valuation Survey,
page 1

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Source for all four pages: TNA ref: IR58/73926/545 Field Book for Harpham
Westfield Valuation Survey 1910, page 1 of 4 - 43kB jpg
1805info3f, sheet 19
This is the second of four pages from the Westfield Farm valuation book, which summarises the gross taxable value over a period of 25 years. It is interesting to note:
  • The buildings were list at the considerable value of £1000.
  • The sporting rights were valued at £5.
  • Annual repairs were estimated at £30.
  • The annual value was calculated to be £275, which over a period of 25 years amounted to £6880 or £5550 after the value of the buildings had been deducted.

Right: Westfield 1910 Valuation Survey,
page 2

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Source for all four pages: TNA ref: IR58/73926/545 Field Book for Harpham
Westfield Valuation Survey 1910, page 2 of 4 - 59kB jpg
1805info3f, sheet 20
This is the third of four pages from the Westfield Farm valuation book, which summarises the buildings and fields. It is interesting to note:
  • The high value of the building is explained by the number of rooms: there being three sitting rooms, eight bedrooms, two kitchens with store, cellar and pantry. A garden green house was also listed.
  • All the buildings were of brick and tile construction, except for the brick, wood and zinc covered yard. They were in fairly good condition.
  • If the productivity or stature of a farm is judged by the number of working horses then Westfield, with a eight horse stable and six loose boxes (for riding horses?). There was a separate stable and saddle room.
  • There was a cow house for seven beasts.
  • The farm appeared to comprise of fifteen fields six of which were 20 acres or greater. One appears to be 41 acres. two are around 15 acres, five less than ten acres and one less than one acre making a total of 232 acres 1 r[ood] and 18 p[erch].
Right: Westfield 1910 Valuation Survey,
page 3

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Source for all four pages: TNA ref: IR58/73926/545 Field Book for Harpham
Westfield Valuation Survey 1910, page 3 of 4 - 64kB jpg
1805info3f, sheet 21
This is the fourth of four pages from the Westfield Farm valuation book, which summarises the taxable value. It is interesting to note:
  • The Assessable Value was the same as the Full Site Value. There were no allowances deducted for the work and expenditure made by Thomas to improve his land.
  • The Full Site Value was the Gross Value less deductions for buildings.
  • The sporting rights were valued at £125(shooting and hunting?) over 25 years.
Right: Westfield 1910 Valuation Survey,
page 4

Click on the image to open an A4 size portrait image at 291kB on a new page. To print scale to 38%.

Source for all four pages: TNA ref: IR58/73926/545 Field Book for Harpham
Westfield Valuation Survey 1910, page 4 of 4 - 66kB jpg
1805info3f, sheet 22
Thomas Crompton's home at the time of the Valuation Survey?

The 1911 census shows only one T Crompton living in the Driffield Registration District. However, this house is located in West Gate, Nafferton and, by the 1911 census Thomas was living at Westfield farm.

It is assumed that plot 538 is adjacent to plot 537.

Right: House in West End attributed to T Crompton - 1910 Valuation Survey
Source: TNA ref: IR 134/10/631 plot 538

House in West End attributed to T Crompton - 1910 Valuation Survey - 51kB jpg
This is the first of four pages from the West Gate house valuation book, which summarises the ownership and expenditures. It is interesting to note:
  • T Crompton lived in a freehold house and 10 acre 'small' garden on a yearly agreement and a rent of £34 which began on 6 April 1910.
  • There are no other Crompton's in the Nafferton census for 1911.
  • The house was co-owned by FR Carter, who does not appear in the 1911 census, who appears to have bought the property in 1895
Right: West Gate house 1910 Valuation Survey, page 1

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Source for all four pages: TNA ref: IR58/73926/538 Field Book for Harpham
House in West End attributed to T Crompton - Valuation page 1 of 4 - 47kB jpg
1805info3f, sheet 23
This is the second of four pages from the West Gate house valuation book, which summarises the gross taxable value over a period of 25 years. It is interesting to note:
  • The house is described as a four bed roomed a brick and tile cottage with kitchen, scullery, dairy and saddle room.
  • There is an adjoining stable for six, a cowshed for four and a hen house described as being in only fair condition.
  • The ash pit toilet is described as bad. A coal place is situated at the end of the cottage.
  • From the rent of £34 a sum of £5/10/0 (£5.50) was deducted. The market value was £28.50 for a period of 25 years to make £800, apportioned between £250 for the structures, £20 for things growing and £530 for the barren land.
Right: West Gate house 1910 Valuation Survey, page 2

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Source for all four pages: TNA ref: IR58/73926/538 Field Book for Harpham
House in West End attributed to T Crompton - Valuation page 2 of 4 - 56kB jpg
1805info3f, sheet 24
This is the third of four pages from the West Gate house valuation book, which summarises the associated acreage. It is interesting to note:
  • This page shows that three fields, of a total of 9 acres, 2 roods and 2 perches were attached to the property.
Right: West Gate house 1910 Valuation Survey, page 3

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Source for all four pages: TNA ref: IR58/73926/538 Field Book for Harpham
House in West End attributed to T Crompton - Valuation page 3 of 4 - 29kB jpg
1805info3f, sheet 25
This is the fourth of four pages from the West Gate house valuation book, which summarises the taxable value. It is interesting to note:
  • The Assessable Value was the Total Value of £800 (£45,648) less the £270 (£15,406) value of the properties structures.
  • The Full Site Value of £579 (£33,037.74) was the Gross Value of £849 less £270 (£15,406) deductions for buildings.
Right: West Gate house 1910 Valuation Survey, page 4

Click on the image to open an A4 size portrait image at 602kB on a new page. To print scale to 38%.

Source for all four pages: TNA ref: IR58/73926/538 Field Book for Harpham
House in West End attributed to T Crompton - Valuation page 4 of 4 - 66kB jpg

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This page was created by Richard Crompton
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Version A.4
Updated 19 July 2010